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Closest Thing to a Wonder Drug-The exercise Pill

In a meta-analysis published in the British Medical Journal by Stanford professor John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, culled data from more than 300 clinical trials, representing more than 300,000 individual patients. In comparing the effectiveness of exercise with various drug interventions to prevent mortality for patients with coronary heart disease or prediabetes, exercise and drug interventions appeared to have similar effects on mortality. Read more about Closest Thing to a Wonder Drug-The exercise Pill[…]

A suggested algorithm for success!

This article originally appeared on Medium. A six step process for success… E.N.G.A.G.E   ENGAGE is a six-step process for discovering what drives you and using it to succeed in your career. Many people’s careers stall because they see strategic, high-level thinking, like knowing what their purpose is or what values drive them, as a “soft Read more about A suggested algorithm for success![…]

Closest Thing to a Wonder Drug-The exercise Pill

In a meta-analysis published in the British Medical Journal by Stanford professor John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, culled data from more than 300 clinical trials, representing more than 300,000 individual patients. In comparing the effectiveness of exercise with various drug interventions to prevent mortality for patients with coronary heart disease or prediabetes, exercise and drug interventions appeared to have similar effects on mortality. Read more about Closest Thing to a Wonder Drug-The exercise Pill[…]

Concierge Medicine…………

Of the estimated 5,500 concierge practices nationwide, about two-thirds charge less than $135 a month on average, up from 49% three years ago, according to Concierge Medicine Today, a trade publication that also runs a research collective for the industry. Inexpensive practices are driving growth in concierge medicine, which is adding offices at a rate Read more about Concierge Medicine…………[…]

Do we make bad healthcare decisions?

The super-confident, doctor-as-god types do not always perform well. One study of radiologists, for example, reveals that those who perform poorly on diagnostic tests are also those most confident in their diagnostic prowess. People are loath to challenge experts. In a 2009 experiment carried out at Emory University, a group of adults was asked to Read more about Do we make bad healthcare decisions?[…]

Are we subjecting ourselves to too many procedures

Is more truly better. As patients demand more tests to try to get to the bottom of their ailments and as physicians acquiesce and  even push it on them who gains and who suffers? It is in this context that we should truly ask ourselves this very important question. While on the surface it does Read more about Are we subjecting ourselves to too many procedures[…]

How many patients are looking for new doctors?

A third of survey respondents say they would change doctors if they could save money under an insurance plan with a different physician network. In a survey of 713 consumers by HealthPocket, if they would be willing to change physicians if it meant saving money on insurance premiums, 34% thought that keeping out-of-pocket insurance costs Read more about How many patients are looking for new doctors?[…]

Direct Mail marketing….. to Physicians?

1. Direct mail effort is part of a strategic, comprehensive marketing plan, something that is becoming more of a necessity for physicians as the Affordable Care Act continues to change the health care landscape. 2. A 2012 study by the Direct Marketing Assn., whose members include direct mail, phone and electronic marketers, found that direct Read more about Direct Mail marketing….. to Physicians?[…]

Doctors Who Profit From Radiation Prescribe It More Often, Study Finds-NYTimes

Are doctors who have a financial interest in treatment centers much more likely to prescribe such treatments for patients? In fact are doctors that get paid for a certain procedure (fee for service) moe likely to perform that procedure? An piece from the NYT provides some insight. Doctors Who Profit From Radiation Prescribe It More Read more about Doctors Who Profit From Radiation Prescribe It More Often, Study Finds-NYTimes[…]

All that glitters is not GOLD-Should we trust all wellness studies?

We are awash in data. The amount of data that we now collect and digitally store is mind boggling. As an example President George W. Bush’s presidential library comprises of 80 terabytes of electronic information with over 200 million e-mails. Compare that to former President Bill Clinton’s library with four terabytes of electronic information with about 20 Read more about All that glitters is not GOLD-Should we trust all wellness studies?[…]

Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture

Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture The benefits of a strong corporate culture are both intuitive and supported by social science. According to James L. Heskett, culture “can account for 20-30% of the differential in corporate performance when compared with ‘culturally unremarkable’ competitors.” And HBR writers have offered advice on navigating different geographic cultures, Read more about Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture[…]

Person-centered Health care Reform-Brookings

The answer to improving care and health while also reducing health care cost growth is Person-centered care. Reforms related provider payment, benefit design, regulation, health plan payment  are reuired. Such reforms could potentially result in $300 billion or more in net federal savings in the next decade, and provide a path to sustaining per capita Read more about Person-centered Health care Reform-Brookings[…]

Our beliefs

Personal choices and decisions are instinctual and modulated by beliefs. Often beliefs are unshakeable even if not rooted in data. The transformation of Jonathan Krohn from an ultra conservative to liberal in this context is a remarkable read. (1) Such transformation usually entail trandformative life experiences, not simply experential. Believers are firm in their position Read more about Our beliefs[…]

Paper use is prevalent despite EMR-Pointing to flaws

Summary: 1. Paper use is prevalent even where EMR have been in place for years. 2. It is important to understand workflow, users and human preferences. 3. A huge opportunity exists for simplifying and developing better user interfaces to bridge the gap. Paper use continues to be prevalent even wen EMR and EHR have been in Read more about Paper use is prevalent despite EMR-Pointing to flaws[…]

Universal healthcare professional licensing will enhance quality and lower costs

Universal licensing in lieu of each of the 52 states requiring healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, chiropractors, dentists, physical therapists, et al, to obtain and maintain a license at a cost of several hundreds of dollars every year is not only unnecessarily burdensome and inefficient but likely hindering competition and quality of care in the Read more about Universal healthcare professional licensing will enhance quality and lower costs[…]

Would you see a Doctor at work place?

Several concerns, foremost that of privacy arise almost immediately. Being seen for an episode of flu may not a big deal. But what if the same person also has HIV or drug addiction and will be sharing that information with a clinic at work-place? According to one estimate, 70% of the estimated 14.8 million Americans Read more about Would you see a Doctor at work place?[…]

How Safeway Saved Millions On Healthcare Benefits?

A case in example is the Safeway experiment. In 2011 Safeway Company instituted reference pricing. They told employees that reimbursement for lab testing would be capped at the 60th percentile of regional prices. Any amount beyond that–was on them. What happened to Safeway’s spending on laboratory tests after the policy went into effect, versus the Read more about How Safeway Saved Millions On Healthcare Benefits?[…]

Digital pathology for Cancer diagnosis and personalized recommendations

The Burden of Cancer • Approximately 40% of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes (based on 2010-2012 data). • In 2016, an estimated 1,685,210 new cases of cancer were diagnosed in the United States and 600,000 people died from the disease. • Worldwide statistics compiled by the Read more about Digital pathology for Cancer diagnosis and personalized recommendations[…]

What is permissible for texting patients? From JAMA…

This review notes that: a) Over half of doctors use text messaging for clinical communications. In reality the use is likely universal. b) The OCR division of HSS which enforces HIPAA, recommends technological neutrality (no security standards or minimum encryption requirements) for electronic communication. c) A set of security standards proposed by the JACHO were Read more about What is permissible for texting patients? From JAMA…[…]

Best Children’s Hospitals 2017-18. Honor Roll.

The 2017-18 rankings were created from data collected through a clinical survey sent to nearly 200 hospitals and a reputational survey sent to about 11,000 doctors who are pediatric specialists. RTI International, a North Carolina-based research and consulting firm that also generates the Best Hospitals rankings, administered both surveys and analyzed the results.More

A fable to help understand and solve the Physician burnout problem from a non-FACHE.

Are Physicians really burned out? Or just poor sport? You have to decide for yourself but the fable about the US rowing team is never the less very interesting. “Once upon a time there was a Red rowing team.  This Red team agreed to hold an annual rowing race with a Green team. Each team would contain 8 Read more about A fable to help understand and solve the Physician burnout problem from a non-FACHE.[…]